Each girl will participate in four workshops, which are clustered into "color groups."

When you register, you will rank your top eight choices for color groups and will be placed in your highest ranked color group based on availability which is first come-first serve

Download a PDF of the workshop descriptions (accessible)

Expanding Your Horizons Homepage

1. Build Your Future: Careers in Architecture

In this workshop, students will learn some basic architecture vocabulary, and have hands on experience in translating their ideas into form.

Susanne Cowan; MSU School of Architecture

4. Using DNA to Improve Livestock Production

Collect DNA from thymus gland and learn about genetic testing in livestock. See how molecular biology and genetics is being used to select better animals and predict how they will perform sometimes even before they are born.

Dr. Jennifer Thomson, Jordan Hieber and Luka Mueller; MSU Department of Animal and Range Sciences

10. Inspecting Sunlight

We can't travel to the Sun, but we know a lot about what it's like there. We can find out about temperatures and movement on the Sun from its light. You can build your own spectrograph and learn how to see the messages hidden in the Sun's light.

Aki Takeda; MSU Department of Physics and Tatsuya Akiyama, MSU Department of Microbiology and Immunology

15. Can We Drink It?

Environmental engineers help make our tap water safe to drink. In towns like Bozeman, water from natural sources is converted to clean, tasty drinking water in a treatment plant. We will learn about water treatment by cleaning up our own samples of dirty water.

Ellen Lauchnor; MSU Department of Civil Engineering 

5. Water Shapes Our World!

Learn about rivers, floods, and how water shapes our habitable world. Use the stream laboratory and giant sandbox to move water and earth, make floods, rivers and deltas.

Jean Dixon; MSU Department of Earth Sciences

8. How Losing My Toes Help Me Find My Passion: Turning Adversity to Strength

When I was in a severe motorcycle accident, I lost one and a half toes and broke ten bones. However, it was integral for me finding my passion for medicine and Neuroscience research. In this workshop, you will learn how my accident played in my current career choice and what I do in Neuroscience and Biology and hope this will help you find your passions.

Zariah Tolman; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

12. Ecology Games: Catching Fire

How can models help us understand wildfire? Come find out by burning a matchstick forest! Students will build and burn a physical model to test how slope and density of trees affect fire spread. Students will also learn ways models are used to study fire ecology and fire management.

Kristen Emmett; MSU Department of Ecology

24. Understanding Insect-Plant Interactions for Sustainable Agriculture

Insects are an indispensable part of agricultural production. It can be a beneficial or harmful way. Whatever the type of relationship with agricultural production their presence in the field is unavoidable to take our agricultural productions sustainable. The main part of this workshop is to explore a basic part of the insect-plant interaction in our agricultural system.

Buddhi Achhami; MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

 2. Crafting New Medical Diagnostics

Crafting and engineering share a common theme: to harness creativity and create a new, functional item. We will demonstrate how crafting tools can be used to create compact devices that can detect small molecules and will discuss how these devices can be used by medical professionals.

Stephanie McCalla; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

5. Water Shapes Our World!

Learn about rivers, floods, and how water shapes our habitable world. Use the stream laboratory and giant sandbox to move water and earth, make floods, rivers and deltas.

Jean Dixon; MSU Department of Earth Sciences

9. Glowing Frog Cells to Study the Brain

We use electricity in our brains to think. Learn how scientists use frog cells to study that electricity! You'll get a chance to prepare the frog cells and watch them glow using a microscope.

Suzy Kohout, Josh Davison and Keith Andrews; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

18. Start Making Scents: Unlocking the Secrets of Plant-Pollinator Communication

This "sense-ational" workshop explores the are of plant-pollinator interactions. Smell different scents that plants use to "talk", see how flowers direct pollinators to nectar sources using special UV runways, and test your investigative skills by trying to determine which insects and animals pollinate different plants based on olfactory and visual clues!

Amy Trowbridge and Shealyn Malone; MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

3. Become a Road Designer!

Designing a road isn't always as simple as connecting "Point A" to "Point B". Learn about some of the challenges faced in transportation engineering. Then, discover design solutions by teaming up and practicing with hands-on models of different transportation scenarios. Bring your curiosity and share your best ideas!

Danae Giannetti; Montana Department of Transportation

7. Exploratory Education in the STEAMlab

The STEAMlab is CMB's high-tech MakerSpace, in which we explore, create, and experiment with all kinds of tech design and engineering.

Natalia Kolnik; Children's Museum of Bozeman

12. Ecology Games: Catching Fire

How can models help us understand wildfire? Come find out by burning a matchstick forest! Students will build and burn a physical model to test how slope and density of trees affect fire spread. Students will also learn ways models are used to study fire ecology and fire management.

Kristen Emmett; MSU Department of Ecology

28. Spherification

Spherification is a fun technique used by upscale restaurants to create caviar-looking bubbles of liquids (e.g., as a way of serving soy sauce with a tuna tartar). With the right ingredients, this can be done at home. This workshop will begin with a short talk on diffusion and spherification. After explaining this process, we will explain what is physically happening to create this membrane. Students will spherify their own liquids and of course taste-test them.

Connie Chang; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering 

4. Using DNA to Improve Livestock Production

Collect DNA from thymus gland and learn about genetic testing in livestock. See how molecular biology and genetics is being used to select better animals and predict how they will perform sometimes even before they are born.

Dr. Jennifer Thomson, Jordan Hieber and Luka Mueller; MSU Department of Animal and Range Sciences

15. Can We Drink It?

Environmental engineers help make our tap water safe to drink. In towns like Bozeman, water from natural sources is converted to clean, tasty drinking water in a treatment plant. We will learn about water treatment by cleaning up our own samples of dirty water.

Ellen Lauchnor; MSU Department of Civil Engineering

16. Our Place in the Universe

Ready to know about our solar system, galaxy and how humans learn about space? Then this workshop is for you. You will learn about how we fit into the universe.

Amy Miller and the Space Public Outreach Team

30. Unseen Worlds: How Microbes Make Their Living in Extreme Environments

We will be looking at how the smallest organisms, called microbes, end up living where they do by looking at how environmental conditions in hot springs in Yellowstone affect where microbes can survive. We will also run an experiment to see what type of sugars microbes can use.

Rebecca Mueller; MSU Thermal Biology Institute 

5. Water Shapes Our World!

Learn about rivers, floods, and how water shapes our habitable world. Use the stream laboratory and giant sandbox to move water and earth, make floods, rivers and deltas.

Jean Dixon; MSU Department of Earth Sciences

11. Virus Epidemic!

Build your own virus! Learn about and discover the different kinds of viruses and how they infect their hosts. Each group will then design their own virus to battle during the final viral epidemic.

Kelly Shepardson and Heather Walk; MSU Department of Microbiology and Immunology

17. Biosafety in the Research Laboratory

Disease-causing pathogens come in many shapes and forms. In order to prevent infections and develop effective medical treatments, we must first understand the biology of these organisms through basic research. Biosafety deals with the proper containment and handling of pathogens, so that research can be performed safely, and our communities and ecosystems can be protected. We will discuss the basic principles of biosafety and learn how scientists protect themselves while carrying this important research. 

Phil Merta; MSU Office of Research Compliance

27. Helping Improve Stem Cells for Therapy and Research

Students will hear about induced pluripotent stem cells, heir characteristics, potential, and problems. Students will participate in a passaging of iPSCs and view the cells on a microscope with a screen, to better illustrate the procedure. Basic sterile techniques will be introduced and demand for the skills will be emphasized.

Elizabeth Corbin; MSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Rebecca Knutson and Clayton Sirling; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience 

1. Build Your Future: Careers in Architecture

In this workshop, students will learn some basic architecture vocabulary, and have hands on experience in translating their ideas into form.

Susanne Cowan; MSU School of Architecture

6. We've Got Gas! Carbon Capture in Molecular Sponges

Absorption is happening all around you - gases and liquids sticking to surfaces. We will demonstrate the power of absorption in well-designed "molecular sponges" with very large internal surfaces (up to a football field per gram) to adsorb gases like CO2 directly from the atmosphere.

Nicholas Stadie and Erin Hanson; MSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

18. Start Making Scents: Unlocking the Secrets of Plant-Pollinator Communication

This "sense-ational" workshop explores the are of plant-pollinator interactions. Smell different scents that plants use to "talk", see how flowers direct pollinators to nectar sources using special UV runways, and test your investigative skills by trying to determine which insects and animals pollinate different plants based on olfactory and visual clues!

Amy Trowbridge and Shealyn Malone; MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

31. Lip Balms and Bath Bombs Away!

Come and discover the chemistry behind lip balms and bath bombs. In this workshop, you will get to create your own and take it home with you!

Stephanie Wettstein, Joelle Romo, Adam Job and Tara Sundsted; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering 

7. Exploratory Education in the STEAMlab

The STEAMlab is CMB's high-tech MakerSpace, in which we explore, create, and experiment with all kinds of tech design and engineering.

Natalia Kolnik; Children's Museum of Bozeman

13. Have Your DNA and Eat It Too!

Build a model of DNA to figure out how DNA divides and fits into all your cells. Then figure out what your DNA says using is special code. Is your DNA mutant? Let's find out!

Jennifer Lachowiec and Megan Hager; MSU Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

19. What(er) in the World?

Where does your drinking water come from and how do you know it's clean? What is water contamination? We will explore the water cycle, basic chemistry and environmental contamination. Learn how everyday items affect water chemistry, translate that to the environment!

Katharine Seipel and Stephanie Bonucci; Enviromin Inc.

23. Are You Interested in Mathematics, Computer Coding and Robots?

Dash is a robot that you will use mathematics to learn how to program. You will use coding to program Dash's movements and behaviors to explore shapes and angles in geometry.

Megan Wickstrom; MSU Department of Mathematical Sciences

3. Become a Road Designer!

Designing a road isn't always as simple as connecting "Point A" to "Point B". Learn about some of the challenges faced in transportation engineering. Then, discover design solutions by teaming up and practicing with hands-on models of different transportation scenarios. Bring your curiosity and share your best ideas!

Danae Giannetti; Montana Department of Transportation

6. We've Got Gas! Carbon Capture in Molecular Sponges

demonstrate the power of absorption in well-designed "molecular sponges" with very large internal surfaces (up to a football field per gram) to adsorb gases like CO2 directly from the atmosphere.

Nicholas Stadie and Erin Hanson; MSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

17. Biosafety in the Research Laboratory

Disease-causing pathogens come in many shapes and forms. In order to prevent infections and develop effective medical treatments, we must first understand the biology of these organisms through basic research. Biosafety deals with the proper containment and handling of pathogens, so that research can be performed safely, and our communities and ecosystems can be protected. We will discuss the basic principles of biosafety and learn how scientists protect themselves while carrying this important research. 

Phil Merta; MSU Office of Research Compliance

22. What's Killing the Bees?

This workshop will explore some of the factors affecting honey bee health and the molecular techniques used to quantify honey bee associated pathogens. This session will begin with a brief presentation on general honey bee biology, colony loss, and the molecular techniques used to detect bee pathogens. You will then take a "crash course" on interpreting the presence of pathogens from PCR and gel electrophoresis in five different stations.

Fenali Parekh and Vanessa Orcutt; MSU Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology 

8. How Losing My Toes Helped Me Find My Passion: Turning Adversity to Strength

When I was in a severe motorcycle accident, I lost one and a half toes and broke ten bones. However, it was integral for me finding my passion for medicine and Neuroscience research. In this workshop, you will learn how my accident played in my current career choice and what I do in Neuroscience and Biology and hope this will help you find your passions.

Zariah Tolman; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

16. Our Place in the Universe

Ready to know about our solar system, galaxy and how humans learn about space? Then this workshop is for you. You will learn about how we fit into the universe.

Amy Miller and the Space Public Outreach Team

25. Television: A Place for Girls

Broadcast television is a terrific field for girls- come run a camera, see what goes on in the control room, or get in front of a green screen! Television needs women trained in engineering, film production, editing, accounting…lots of STEM fields!

Paul Heitt-Rennie; MontanaPBS

29. Watersheds and Water Users

Every living thing needs water! Who are the water users in our watersheds and how do we ensure there is enough water to go around? In this workshop, we discover where and what is our local watershed and learn how water scientists help decide how our water is used.

Rose Vallor; MSU Department of Education and Meryl Storb; MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

9. Glowing Frog Cells to Study the Brain

We use electricity in our brains to think. Learn how scientists use frog cells to study that electricity! You'll get a chance to prepare the frog cells and watch them glow using a microscope.

Suzy Kohout, Josh Davison and Keith Andrews; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

15. Can We Drink It?

Environmental engineers help make our tap water safe to drink. In towns like Bozeman, water from natural sources is converted to clean, tasty drinking water in a treatment plant. We will learn about water treatment by cleaning up our own samples of dirty water.

Ellen Lauchnor; MSU Department of Civil Engineering

23. Are You Interested in Mathematics, Computer Coding and Robots?

Dash is a robot that you will use mathematics to learn how to program. You will use coding to program Dash's movements and behaviors to explore shapes and angles in geometry.

Megan Wickstrom; MSU Department of Mathematical Sciences

32. Shake it Up! How to Capture Little Green Cells

Students will learn about how to harvest microorganisms and participate in flocculating their own tube of microalgae by adding an aggregating agent, shaking it all up and watching to see what happens to their little green cells!

Kate Morrissey; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

3. Become a Road Designer!

Designing a road isn't always as simple as connecting "Point A" to "Point B". Learn about some of the challenges faced in transportation engineering. Then, discover design solutions by teaming up and practicing with hands-on models of different transportation scenarios. Bring your curiosity and share your best ideas!

Danae Giannetti; Montana Department of Transportation

5. Water Shapes Our World!

Learn about rivers, floods, and how water shapes our habitable world. Use the stream laboratory and giant sandbox to move water and earth, make floods, rivers and deltas.

Jean Dixon; MSU Department of Earth Sciences

9. Glowing Frog Cells to Study the Brain

We use electricity in our brains to think. Learn how scientists use frog cells to study that electricity! You'll get a chance to prepare the frog cells and watch them glow using a microscope.

Suzy Kohout, Josh Davison and Keith Andrews; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

17. Biosafety in the Research Laboratory

Disease-causing pathogens come in many shapes and forms. In order to prevent infections and develop effective medical treatments, we must first understand the biology of these organisms through basic research. Biosafety deals with the proper containment and handling of pathogens, so that research can be performed safely, and our communities and ecosystems can be protected. We will discuss the basic principles of biosafety and learn how scientists protect themselves while carrying this important research. 

Phil Merta; MSU Office of Research Compliance

11. Virus Epidemic!

Build your own virus! Learn about and discover the different kinds of viruses and how they infect their hosts. Each group will then design their own virus to battle during the final viral epidemic.

Kelly Shepardson and Heather Walk; MSU Department of Microbiology and Immunology

13. Have Your DNA and Eat It Too!

Build a model of DNA to figure out how DNA divides and fits into all your cells. Then figure out what your DNA says using is special code. Is your DNA mutant? Let's find out!

Jennifer Lachowiec and Megan Hager; MSU Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

20. Fossils of Montana

Montana has a rich paleontological history, from 2-billion-year-old stromatolite fossils to dinosaurs like T-rex, and all the way through to Ice Age mammoths! Learn about famous fossils from Montana, and get hands-on experience preparing fossils from the Museum of the Rockies with help from museum paleontologists.

Amy Atwater and Scott Williams; Museum of the Rockies

26. This Little Piggy and Probability

Porker Brothers© needs your help developing rules for a new game. But how do you make a "fair" game if players will roll a plastic pig instead of a six-sided die? We'll play with pigs, develop game strategies and explore how this all fits in with probability and statistics.

Jennifer Green, Allison Theobold, Nicole Carnegie, Katie Banner, Megan Higgs, Meaghan Winder, Esther Birch and Kara Johnson; MSU Department of Mathematical Sciences 

10. Inspecting Sunlight

We can't travel to the Sun, but we know a lot about what it's like there. We can find out about temperatures and movement on the Sun from its light. You can build your own spectrograph and learn how to see the messages hidden in the Sun's light.

Aki Takeda; MSU Department of Physics and Tatsuya Akiyama, MSU Department of Microbiology and Immunology

15. Can We Drink It?

Environmental engineers help make our tap water safe to drink. In towns like Bozeman, water from natural sources is converted to clean, tasty drinking water in a treatment plant. We will learn about water treatment by cleaning up our own samples of dirty water.

Ellen Lauchnor; MSU Department of Civil Engineering

20. Fossils of Montana

Montana has a rich paleontological history, from 2-billion-year-old stromatolite fossils to dinosaurs like T-rex, and all the way through to Ice Age mammoths! Learn about famous fossils from Montana, and get hands-on experience preparing fossils from the Museum of the Rockies with help from museum paleontologists.

Amy Atwater and Scott Williams; Museum of the Rockies

27. Helping Improve Stem Cells for Therapy and Research

Students will hear about induced pluripotent stem cells, heir characteristics, potential, and problems. Students will participate in a passaging of iPSCs and view the cells on a microscope with a screen, to better illustrate the procedure. Basic sterile techniques will be introduced and demand for the skills will be emphasized.

Elizabeth Corbin; MSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Rebecca Knutson and Clayton Sirling; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

1. Build Your Future: Careers in Architecture

In this workshop, students will learn some basic architecture vocabulary, and have hands on experience in translating their ideas into form.

Susanne Cowan; MSU School of Architecture

11. Virus Epidemic!

Build your own virus! Learn about and discover the different kinds of viruses and how they infect their hosts. Each group will then design their own virus to battle during the final viral epidemic.

Kelly Shepardson and Heather Walk; MSU Department of Microbiology and Immunology

12. Ecology Games: Catching Fire

How can models help us understand wildfire? Come find out by burning a matchstick forest! Students will build and burn a physical model to test how slope and density of trees affect fire spread. Students will also learn ways models are used to study fire ecology and fire management.

Kristen Emmett; MSU Department of Ecology

18. Start Making Scents: Unlocking the Secrets of Plant-Pollinator Communication

This "sense-ational" workshop explores the are of plant-pollinator interactions. Smell different scents that plants use to "talk", see how flowers direct pollinators to nectar sources using special UV runways, and test your investigative skills by trying to determine which insects and animals pollinate different plants based on olfactory and visual clues!

Amy Trowbridge and Shealyn Malone; MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

12. Ecology Games: Catching Fire

How can models help us understand wildfire? Come find out by burning a matchstick forest! Students will build and burn a physical model to test how slope and density of trees affect fire spread. Students will also learn ways models are used to study fire ecology and fire management.

Kristen Emmett; MSU Department of Ecology

19. What(er) in the World?

Where does your drinking water come from and how do you know it's clean? What is water contamination? We will explore the water cycle, basic chemistry and environmental contamination. Learn how everyday items affect water chemistry, translate that to the environment!

Katharine Seipel and Stephanie Bonucci; Enviromin Inc.

28. Spherification

Spherification is a fun technique used by upscale restaurants to create caviar-looking bubbles of liquids (e.g., as a way of serving soy sauce with a tuna tartar). With the right ingredients, this can be done at home. This workshop will begin with a short talk on diffusion and spherification. After explaining this process, we will explain what is physically happening to create this membrane. Students will spherify their own liquids and of course taste-test them.

Connie Chang; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

30. Unseen Worlds: How Microbes Make Their Living in Extreme Environments

We will be looking at how the smallest organisms, called microbes, end up living where they do by looking at how environmental conditions in hot springs in Yellowstone affect where microbes can survive. We will also run an experiment to see what type of sugars microbes can use.

Rebecca Mueller; MSU Thermal Biology Institute

8. How Losing My Toes Helped Me Find My Passion: Turning Adversity to Strength

When I was in a severe motorcycle accident, I lost one and a half toes and broke ten bones. However, it was integral for me finding my passion for medicine and Neuroscience research. In this workshop, you will learn how my accident played in my current career choice and what I do in Neuroscience and Biology and hope this will help you find your passions.

Zariah Tolman; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

13. Have Your DNA and Eat It Too!

Build a model of DNA to figure out how DNA divides and fits into all your cells. Then figure out what your DNA says using is special code. Is your DNA mutant? Let's find out!

Jennifer Lachowiec and Megan Hager; MSU Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

16. Our Place in the Universe

Ready to know about our solar system, galaxy and how humans learn about space? Then this workshop is for you. You will learn about how we fit into the universe.

Amy Miller and the Space Public Outreach Team

32. Shake it Up! How to Capture Little Green Cells

Students will learn about how to harvest microorganisms and participate in flocculating their own tube of microalgae by adding an aggregating agent, shaking it all up and watching to see what happens to their little green cells!

Kate Morrissey; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

6. We've Got Gas! Carbon Capture in Molecular Sponges

demonstrate the power of absorption in well-designed "molecular sponges" with very large internal surfaces (up to a football field per gram) to adsorb gases like CO2 directly from the atmosphere.

Nicholas Stadie and Erin Hanson; MSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

7. Exploratory Education in the STEAMlab

The STEAMlab is CMB's high-tech MakerSpace, in which we explore, create, and experiment with all kinds of tech design and engineering.

Natalia Kolnik; Children's Museum of Bozeman

14. Electricity and Magnetism at Work: Create Your Own Electric Motor!

Electricity and magnetism work together in many fascinating ways. You will put electricity and magnetism to work by creating your own spinning electric motor using some wire, a magnet, and a small battery. You even get to take your motor home with you at the conclusion of the workshop!

Rob Maher, Allison Banfield and Ross Snider; MSU Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

19. What(er) in the World?

Where does your drinking water come from and how do you know it's clean? What is water contamination? We will explore the water cycle, basic chemistry and environmental contamination. Learn how everyday items affect water chemistry, translate that to the environment!

Katharine Seipel and Stephanie Bonucci; Enviromin Inc.

2. Crafting New Medical Diagnostics

Crafting and engineering share a common theme: to harness creativity and create a new, functional item. We will demonstrate how crafting tools can be used to create compact devices that can detect small molecules and will discuss how these devices can be used by medical professionals.

Stephanie McCalla; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

11. Virus Epidemic!

Build your own virus! Learn about and discover the different kinds of viruses and how they infect their hosts. Each group will then design their own virus to battle during the final viral epidemic.

Kelly Shepardson and Heather Walk; MSU Department of Microbiology and Immunology

15. Can We Drink It?

Environmental engineers help make our tap water safe to drink. In towns like Bozeman, water from natural sources is converted to clean, tasty drinking water in a treatment plant. We will learn about water treatment by cleaning up our own samples of dirty water.

Ellen Lauchnor; MSU Department of Civil Engineering

 20. Fossils of Montana

Montana has a rich paleontological history, from 2-billion-year-old stromatolite fossils to dinosaurs like T-rex, and all the way through to Ice Age mammoths! Learn about famous fossils from Montana, and get hands-on experience preparing fossils from the Museum of the Rockies with help from museum paleontologists.

Amy Atwater and Scott Williams; Museum of the Rockies 

4. Using DNA to Improve Livestock Production

Collect DNA from thymus gland and learn about genetic testing in livestock. See how molecular biology and genetics is being used to select better animals and predict how they will perform sometimes even before they are born.

Dr. Jennifer Thomson, Jordan Hieber and Luka Mueller; MSU Department of Animal and Range Sciences

8. How Losing My Toes Helped Me Find My Passion: Turning Adversity to Strength

When I was in a severe motorcycle accident, I lost one and a half toes and broke ten bones. However, it was integral for me finding my passion for medicine and Neuroscience research. In this workshop, you will learn how my accident played in my current career choice and what I do in Neuroscience and Biology and hope this will help you find your passions.

Zariah Tolman; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

16. Our Place in the Universe

Ready to know about our solar system, galaxy and how humans learn about space? Then this workshop is for you. You will learn about how we fit into the universe.

Amy Miller and the Space Public Outreach Team

21. Storytelling with ALICE

Storytelling is a creative way to relate your view of the world to your friends and family, but we'll take storytelling another step. You will tell your story and learn the basic concepts of programming using Alice, a 3D environment that makes it easy to animate a story. Join us and learn how to express your story in a virtual world created by you!

Brittany Fasy; MSU Gianforte School of Computing and Barbara do Amaral; MSU Department of Education, Health and Human Developmentt

2. Crafting New Medical Diagnostics

Crafting and engineering share a common theme: to harness creativity and create a new, functional item. We will demonstrate how crafting tools can be used to create compact devices that can detect small molecules and will discuss how these devices can be used by medical professionals.

Stephanie McCalla; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

4. Using DNA to Improve Livestock Production

Collect DNA from thymus gland and learn about genetic testing in livestock. See how molecular biology and genetics is being used to select better animals and predict how they will perform sometimes even before they are born.

Dr. Jennifer Thomson, Jordan Hieber and Luka Mueller; MSU Department of Animal and Range Sciences

14. Electricity and Magnetism at Work: Create Your Own Electric Motor!

Electricity and magnetism work together in many fascinating ways. You will put electricity and magnetism to work by creating your own spinning electric motor using some wire, a magnet, and a small battery. You even get to take your motor home with you at the conclusion of the workshop!

Rob Maher, Allison Banfield and Ross Snider; MSU Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

25. Television: A Place for Girls

Broadcast television is a terrific field for girls- come run a camera, see what goes on in the control room, or get in front of a green screen! Television needs women trained in engineering, film production, editing, accounting…lots of STEM fields!

Paul Heitt-Rennie; MontanaPBS

9. Glowing Frog Cells to Study the Brain

We use electricity in our brains to think. Learn how scientists use frog cells to study that electricity! You'll get a chance to prepare the frog cells and watch them glow using a microscope.

Suzy Kohout, Josh Davison and Keith Andrews; MSU Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience

14. Electricity and Magnetism at Work: Create Your Own Electric Motor!

Electricity and magnetism work together in many fascinating ways. You will put electricity and magnetism to work by creating your own spinning electric motor using some wire, a magnet, and a small battery. You even get to take your motor home with you at the conclusion of the workshop!

Rob Maher, Allison Banfield and Ross Snider; MSU Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

17. Biosafety in the Research Laboratory

Disease-causing pathogens come in many shapes and forms. In order to prevent infections and develop effective medical treatments, we must first understand the biology of these organisms through basic research. Biosafety deals with the proper containment and handling of pathogens, so that research can be performed safely, and our communities and ecosystems can be protected. We will discuss the basic principles of biosafety and learn how scientists protect themselves while carrying this important research. 

Phil Merta; MSU Office of Research Compliance

26. This Little Piggy and Probability

Porker Brothers© needs your help developing rules for a new game. But how do you make a "fair" game if players will roll a plastic pig instead of a six-sided die? We'll play with pigs, develop game strategies and explore how this all fits in with probability and statistics.

Jennifer Green, Allison Theobold, Nicole Carnegie, Katie Banner, Megan Higgs, Meaghan Winder, Esther Birch and Kara Johnson; MSU Department of Mathematical Sciences

2. Crafting New Medical Diagnostics

Crafting and engineering share a common theme: to harness creativity and create a new, functional item. We will demonstrate how crafting tools can be used to create compact devices that can detect small molecules and will discuss how these devices can be used by medical professionals.

Stephanie McCalla; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

6. We've Got Gas! Carbon Capture in Molecular Sponges

Absorption is happening all around you - gases and liquids sticking to surfaces. We will demonstrate the power of absorption in well-designed "molecular sponges" with very large internal surfaces (up to a football field per gram) to adsorb gases like CO2 directly from the atmosphere.

Nicholas Stadie and Erin Hanson; MSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

10. Inspecting Sunlight

We can't travel to the Sun, but we know a lot about what it's like there. We can find out about temperatures and movement on the Sun from its light. You can build your own spectrograph and learn how to see the messages hidden in the Sun's light.

Aki Takeda; MSU Department of Physics and Tatsuya Akiyama, MSU Department of Microbiology and Immunology

18. Start Making Scents: Unlocking the Secrets of Plant-Pollinator Communication

This "sense-ational" workshop explores the are of plant-pollinator interactions. Smell different scents that plants use to "talk", see how flowers direct pollinators to nectar sources using special UV runways, and test your investigative skills by trying to determine which insects and animals pollinate different plants based on olfactory and visual clues!

Amy Trowbridge and Shealyn Malone; MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

19. What(er) in the World?

Where does your drinking water come from and how do you know it's clean? What is water contamination? We will explore the water cycle, basic chemistry and environmental contamination. Learn how everyday items affect water chemistry, translate that to the environment!

Katharine Seipel and Stephanie Bonucci; Enviromin Inc.

22. What's Killing the Bees?

This workshop will explore some of the factors affecting honey bee health and the molecular techniques used to quantify honey bee associated pathogens. This session will begin with a brief presentation on general honey bee biology, colony loss, and the molecular techniques used to detect bee pathogens. You will then take a "crash course" on interpreting the presence of pathogens from PCR and gel electrophoresis in five different stations.

Fenali Parekh and Vanessa Orcutt; MSU Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

7. Exploratory Education in the STEAMlab

The STEAMlab is CMB's high-tech MakerSpace, in which we explore, create, and experiment with all kinds of tech design and engineering.

Natalia Kolnik; Children's Museum of Bozeman

31. Lip Balms and Bath Bombs Away!

Come and discover the chemistry behind lip balms and bath bombs. In this workshop, you will get to create your own and take it home with you!

Stephanie Wettstein, Joelle Romo, Adam Job and Tara Sundsted; MSU Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

3. Become a Road Designer!

Designing a road isn't always as simple as connecting "Point A" to "Point B". Learn about some of the challenges faced in transportation engineering. Then, discover design solutions by teaming up and practicing with hands-on models of different transportation scenarios. Bring your curiosity and share your best ideas!

Danae Giannetti; Montana Department of Transportation

13. Have Your DNA and Eat It Too!

Build a model of DNA to figure out how DNA divides and fits into all your cells. Then figure out what your DNA says using is special code. Is your DNA mutant? Let's find out!

Jennifer Lachowiec and Megan Hager; MSU Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

20. Fossils of Montana

Montana has a rich paleontological history, from 2-billion-year-old stromatolite fossils to dinosaurs like T-rex, and all the way through to Ice Age mammoths! Learn about famous fossils from Montana, and get hands-on experience preparing fossils from the Museum of the Rockies with help from museum paleontologists.

Amy Atwater and Scott Williams; Museum of the Rockies

24. Understanding Insect-Plant Interactions for Sustainable Agriculture

Insects are an indispensable part of agricultural production. It can be a beneficial or harmful way. Whatever the type of relationship with agricultural production their presence in the field is unavoidable to take our agricultural productions sustainable. The main part of this workshop is to explore a basic part of the insect-plant interaction in our agricultural system.

Buddhi Achhami; MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

1. Build Your Future: Careers in Architecture

In this workshop, students will learn some basic architecture vocabulary, and have hands on experience in translating their ideas into form.

Susanne Cowan; MSU School of Architecture

10. Inspecting Sunlight

We can't travel to the Sun, but we know a lot about what it's like there. We can find out about temperatures and movement on the Sun from its light. You can build your own spectrograph and learn how to see the messages hidden in the Sun's light.

Aki Takeda; MSU Department of Physics and Tatsuya Akiyama, MSU Department of Microbiology and Immunology

21. Storytelling with ALICE

Storytelling is a creative way to relate your view of the world to your friends and family, but we'll take storytelling another step. You will tell your story and learn the basic concepts of programming using Alice, a 3D environment that makes it easy to animate a story. Join us and learn how to express your story in a virtual world created by you!

Brittany Fasy; MSU Gianforte School of Computing and Barbara do Amaral; MSU Department of Education, Health and Human Development

29. Watersheds and Water Users

Every living thing needs water! Who are the water users in our watersheds and how do we ensure there is enough water to go around? In this workshop, we discover where and what is our local watershed and learn how water scientists help decide how our water is used.

Rose Vallor; MSU Department of Education and Meryl Storb; MSU Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

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