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MONTANA CLIMATE ASSESSMENT

 

The Montana Climate Assessment began with efforts to identify which climate change topics were important to Montanans in ensuring the state’s economic and cultural viability. The report is the result of two years of effort by university faculty and students, state and federal agency researchers, non-profit organizations, resource managers, and citizens from across Montana. It is hoped that this first Montana Climate Assessment motivates much-needed discussion and leads to science-informed planning efforts and action in the areas of water, forests, and agriculture, as well as sets a pathway for future climate-change research relevant to Montana.

An increased understanding of the changes happening in Montana, now and into the future, should help our state plan, make decisions, and take actions to promote the well-being of Montanans and our treasured landscapes for many years to come.

Montanan’s right to clean, healthful environment An increased understanding of the changes happening in Montana, now and into the future, should help our state plan, make decisions, and take actions to promote the well-being of Montanans and our treasured landscapes for many years to come.

 

 

 

Montana's Changing Climate

MONTANA'S CHANGING CLIMATE

FREE ONLINE COURSE
Explore the Montana Climate Assessment, and access resources about what we know and how we know what we know about Montana's past, current, and future climate.

 

SPOTLIGHT

 

Bee keeping people

What Makes Bees Sick?

A conversation with Michelle Flenniken, Assistant Research Professor of Plant Sciences & Plant Pathology at Montana State University


What is the question people most often ask you regarding your research?

The most common question is “What’s killing the bees?” – and unfortunately there doesn’t appear to be a simple answer. Research to date suggests that multiple biotic and abiotic factors contribute to colony health and survival (e.g., viruses, mites, microbes, bee genetics, weather, forage quality and availability, management practices, and agrochemical exposure). Although no single factor is responsible for colony losses or Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), honey bee samples from CCD-affected colonies had greater pathogen (e.g., viruses and Nosema) prevalence and abundance compared to unaffected colonies (Cornman et al. 2012; Cox-Foster et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2009; Steinhauer et al. 2015; vanEngelsdorp et al. 2009).

 


CITIZEN SCIENCE

 Habitat Connections: Birds and Citizen Science

Habitat Connections: Birds and Citizen Science

The Montana Girls STEM Collaborative, an outreach program of Montana NSF EPSCoR, was chosen to participate in Habitat Connections: Birds and Citizen Science, a program of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Elk Grazing Study

Elk Grazing Study 

Citizen scientists learned about the impact of climate change on elk in the Upper Yellowstone River Basin while picking up elk scat samples at the Dome Mountain Wildlife Management Area in Paradise Valley.  

 

 

Academic Technology and Outreach
Montana State University
P.O. Box 173860
Bozeman, MT 59717-3860

Tel: (406) 994-6550
Fax: (406) 994-7856
E-mail: ato@montana.edu
Location: 128 Barnard Hall

Director:
Kim Obbink

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